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The 5 Secrets Behind Red Carpet Events

Planning red carpet events usually comes with an extra level of stress. Since you are working with VIPs and celebrities your job ends up seeming like a very precarious balancing act, trying to keep things orderly, flowing and on time. We know it’s not easy so we came up with some tips to keep in mind.

1. Make two separate lines. The key is to keep the red carpet clear and free. Make a separate line for non-VIPs to go directly into the rest of the event. This way photographers and media can get the shoots they need and you won’t have blockages leading in.

2. Tell photogs where to stand. Don’t be afraid to be super type-A and assign each individual photographer a spot to stand. When the light bulbs are flashing, things can get pretty hectic and it’s better for everyone to know where there supposed to be. Leave no uncertainties.

3. Have someone take the lead. Place someone in charge who can really take hold of the red carpet process. Someone should always be directing traffic and encouraging continuous movement. This person should be courteous but firm.

4. Use name cards. Rather than having someone shout out the celebrities name as they walk by, have someone walk in front of them with a large name card. This way photographers and other press can not only know who is coming next, but they can also easily take a picture of the card and use it as a reminder who was who later.

5. Be prepared to wait. As with most things dealing with celebrities and VIPs, you unfortunately can never be 100% sure if they’re going to be on time or not, so last but not least you might want to find press who are used to waiting and hope for the best!


Christina Olenick is blogging for zkipster and writes about professional guest list management and digital event check in. This This blog was orginally published on zkipster’s website.

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